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NEYD - view from the trainees

Written by Amar Puttanna on 29 June 2015. Modified on 02 July 2015. Hits: 3156

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The North European Young Diabetologists meeting was a resounding success and continued the tradition of high calibre events organised by YDEF. Here we have two attendees giving their unique perspectives on the meeting this year...

 

 

It’s not every day that you are offered the chance to present your work somewhere you’ve never been before, all expenses paid – at least not as a clinical lecturer. Hot on the heels of a poster presentation at the DUK annual professional conference and whilst mulling over the prospect of writing it up, I put forward an abstract of our large audit of ACR utilisation in screening for albuminuria. This time the forum was the annual meeting of the North European Young Diabetologists (NEYD), held in the picturesque town of Bergen in the Netherlands.

NEYD, or the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Club as it used to be known, has a pedigree that goes back some 30 years: many a fledgling diabetologist, some now more famous than others, once took the stage in front of an audience of peers. This tradition of a tripartite international specialty meeting with delegates from the three founding countries (plus Belgium) has clearly stood the test of time. What made this so special?

Still reeling from a long weekend on night duty, I arrived in Schiphol Airport on a Wednesday morning and rendezvoused at the iconic “red and white cube”. Our “early riser” group was duly greeted and whisked off, through 45 minutes of pleasant countryside, to the meeting venue in Bergen. After lunch, a quick mingle with other delegates and a welcome speech from our Dutch hosts, Titia and Daniel, we got down to business. Over three days and seven themed sessions, we were treated to presentations from each of the 28 delegates on topics ranging from physiological to psychosocial to clinical aspects of hypoglycaemia and diabetes. These were interspersed with a plenary lecture on cardiovascular outcome trials in diabetes by Prof Jørgen Rungby; a lively and entertaining debate between Profs Henk “The Bear” Bilo and Rory McCrimmon on the potential value of newer diabetes therapies in type 1 diabetes; and a bike ride to the nearby beach at Bergen-aan-Zee.

The meeting closed on Friday lunchtime with the award of a prize for best presentation, which deservedly went to Aleks from Denmark. We set off on the journey home with a packed lunch, courtesy of our hosts; rested and refreshed; and with a long list of things to read up on. The informal meeting atmosphere, impeccable Dutch hospitality and pleasant countryside venue, as well as the fact that delegates were so much part of the programme, made for one of the most memorable meetings I have been to.

Thanks are very much due to the YDEF for helping to organise this meeting; and to the corporate supporters of NEYD, in particular to Boehringer Ingelheim for sponsoring the UK delegation.

Joannis Vamvakopoulos (West Midlands trainee)

 

NEYD was my very first experience of presenting research, and as a meeting that is well known for its intimacy and friendliness this seemed like a perfect opportunity for the more inexperienced presenter!

Everything was organised to perfection from being greeted at the airport by the Dutch organisers to airport transfers to the days' programmes of events. Each day had a well-structured range of presentations from various areas of interest within diabetology with opportunity for questions after each talk. The evenings included opportunity to socialise with other delegates including a bike ride to the nearby beach (slightly more challenging for the English compared to our Dutch and Danish counterparts- much to their amusement!) and a delicious 3 course a la carte dinner each evening. 

It was fascinating to learn about current research being conducted by our colleagues around North Europe, and a great opportunity to network with young researchers sharing a common interest. 

 

Georgina Moritz (5th year Medical Student, University of Birmingham)

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